Schools, Colleges and Universities

Supporting Young People in Schools, Colleges and Universities

With two in every three students feeling down at University at some point, it’s important someone is there to support young people’s mental health. Our Hampshire based, Heads Up teams equips students aged 15 – 24 to better understand their mental health and how they can play their part in ending discrimination. We believe it is crucial that the next generation are educated about mental health issues; and so we teach young people the facts about symptoms, techniques for managing their mental health and where they can turn to for help.

See our young peoples’ quick tips guide to maintaining your wellbeing: PDF

All our volunteers have first hand experience of mental health problems and talk openly about their own experiences. By meeting with young people in schools, colleges and universities in Hampshire, they act as role models inspiring other young people to speak out about their mental health, how to get help and are putting an end to discrimination.

In 2014-2015, 2398 young people attended talks by our heads up team.

How we can help your School, College or University:

  • Education – Through assemblies or workshops we provide the know-how about mental health issues from our trained volunteers who have first hand experience.

  • Student Support – We facilitate peer support networks which are vital in helping young people discuss their feelings and receive help from those around them.

  • Signposting – If a student needs extra support from outside we signpost to Solent Mind teams or other local sources of help.

To get in touch with our team please e-mail headsup@solentmind.org.uk or call 07758 886 001

Jasmine’s Story

“I have a mental health problem and so I know what it’s like first hand to deal with the issues this brings with it. It’s often the small things like telling your friends about it, or that you’ve got to go for treatment. My friends have often been fearful at first when I’ve told them about my condition. When I was at school, I had no idea mental health problems affected people my age or that it could affect me. When things did start to get difficult for me, it would have been helpful for me and my friends to know the warning signs.

I now volunteer for the Heads Up team. I love being able to explain and re-assure young people that mental health problems are okay, they can ask for help and show them where to turn.”